Expert Panel Outline

Interconnected and Integrated: Optimising Intelligent Infrastructure
 
Wednesday, 26 May 2010 - 14.00-15.30 - Hall 3
Panel Summary and Conclusions
 
 
This session will review the potential of more intelligent transport infrastructure, exploiting advanced telecommunications technologies, to interconnect transport systems and transport system users to deliver significant improvements in efficiency. The issues to be explored are:
 
  • What is intelligent infrastructure and what innovations can be foreseen for the future?
  • How can innovation in intelligent infrastructure help to foster more efficient, safe and sustainable transport systems?
  • How can innovation in intelligent infrastructure foster increased inter-modal connections?
  • Who should pay for advanced technologies for transport infrastructure?
  • What scale of benefits is likely to be delivered by innovative intelligent infrastructure nationally and internationally?
  • What are the trans-border implications?
 
Chair
 
  • Peter Sweatman, Director, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, USA
 
Panellists
 
  • John Augustine, Managing Director ITS, US Research & Innovative Technology Administration
  • Gabriel Colceag, Vice President, Thales
  • Volker Kefer, Management Board Member, Deutsche Bahn AG
  • Joseph Lam, President, Systems Business, -Delcan Corporation
  • Hermann Meyer, CEO, ERTICO-ITS Europe
  • Pedro Pedreira, Executive Director, European GNSS Supervisory Authority
  • Kentaro Sakamoto, Senior Vice President, ITS Japan
 
Background
 
More intelligent transport infrastructure, exploiting advanced telecommunications technologies to interconnect transport systems and users, promises to deliver significant improvements in efficiency.

This session will review the potential of intelligent infrastructure and infrastructure-to-vehicle communications for electronic links for all transport modes. It will examine future technologies and potential applications in speed management, variable messaging, congestion charging and electronic toll collection, automated highways, and guidance systems. Their impact on traffic management and possible policy ramifications will be discussed. The development of satellite technology will also be dealt with here.

The session will also consider possible obstacles to the introduction of more intelligent transport systems, including funding for new infrastructure and interoperability between different technologies and regions. It aims to identify further actions required of governments, suppliers or other parties to facilitate the deployment of intelligent infrastructure on a costeffective basis in priority areas across Forum member countries.
 
  • Physical barriers – these include reducing the friction of mode transfers, reducing time losses, increasing system interoperability and implementing area-wide and virtual ticketing. It will also require overcoming specific hurdles for the young, as well as disabled and older people.
  • Information barriers related to travel opportunities, schedules and systems operation. Here new types of information platforms, services and integration will play an important role.
  • Behavioural barriers facing the uptake and commercial success of new mobility models. Entrenched travel habits are hard to change.
The session aims to identify what strategies can help overcome these barriers.
 
Slides/Presentations
 
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